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Marketing of Series 11

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1 Marketing of Series 11 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:07 am

This is going to be ultra short because I lost all my notes/links/other documentations.   /tears hair out/

So instead, I'm just going to open it up for general discussion.

To get us started I propose this:
The Marketing of Series 11 is actually brilliant, because most of it has been pretty much FREE!  


  • All the leaked footage/court orders/etc, led to a lot of press and they didn't have to pay a dime for any of it.  It was all reported as 'News'.  

  • The constant debate about the first Fem!Doc also provided a lot of free press.  

  • And that's without talking about websites like this or popular social media platforms (twitter/fb/tumblr/etc).


So, they sunk their money into these indents. And even those were somewhat controversial to generate more free press around them.  

So like or hate what you've seen, from a strict marketing strategy, it was actually quite brilliant.



Last edited by tardis on Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:08 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : html is my bane)


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2 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:43 am

So far we've had:

- A completely worthless 50 second teaser where Bradley Walsh sits inside a cafe reading an issue of the Beano.
- An incredibly shitty and generic 50 second trailer where the 13th Doctor begs her new companions and by extension, the audience, to be her new best friends.
-  An embarrassing 30 second teaser with a not-so-subtle breaking the glass ceiling metaphor with shitty pop music playing in the background.


You think this is good marketing?

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3 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:56 am

lols

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4 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 10:43 am

No doubt have they raised much awareness without monetary price, but as to how well that will translate onto present and stable viewers - I am decidedly sceptical.

The major audience for Doctor Who has traditionally been children. How enthused will a child be at what they've seen so far of the series? Through empathy - disregarding politics - I, as a child, would be strongly questioning the purpose in viewing the upcoming series. Where are the monsters? The returning characters and villains? The exciting alien worlds? This doesn't look like a programme that would appeal to children.
In truth I'd probably have been alienated before then, even with the innocence of youth.

The only people who are particularly eager to see the new series are those, likely a minority, that would gain satisfaction in the political appeasement. Yet, I am not convinced that this would be sufficient to keep them around beyond the first or first few episodes.

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5 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:36 pm

@TiberiusDidNothingWrong wrote:No doubt have they raised much awareness without monetary price, but as to how well that will translate onto present and stable viewers - I am decidedly sceptical.

The major audience for Doctor Who has traditionally been children. How enthused will a child be at what they've seen so far of the series? Through empathy - disregarding politics - I, as a child, would be strongly questioning the purpose in viewing the upcoming series. Where are the monsters? The returning characters and villains? The exciting alien worlds? This doesn't look like a programme that would appeal to children.
In truth I'd probably have been alienated before then, even with the innocence of youth.

The only people who are particularly eager to see the new series are those, likely a minority, that would gain satisfaction in the political appeasement. Yet, I am not convinced that this would be sufficient to keep them around beyond the first or first few episodes.

I agree with your comments about viewer retention. Though I would point out that by and large the retention of viewership isn't really Marketing's focus (or problem, usually, anymore). Usually, they're more interested in new viewers and simply spreading the word. Which, they've accomplished in this case. There are a lot of people talking about Doctor Who, who I've never seen talk about it before. They generated 'buzz' as the saying goes.

Marketing has changed a bit since I was in college, back then, there was a dual focus of new and retention of "subscribers". But even in other settings (IE: academic, hospital, non-profit organisations), in recent years, the focus and goal is all about 'new' subscribers and any attention they can get. Retention is secondary because a lot of grant monies and such sees "new/increased" as a priority over retention (retention used to be primary for grants). It's a sad transition to me because, like the case of Doctor Who, a lot of the people who supported these areas all their lives feel left out and might stop donating money/watching programs, etc.

There's a false concept that the new people will be enough to balance out the retained ones they lose. This CAN happen, but usually the new folks aren't as likely to donate money and/or remain as long as the 'retention folks'. Today's society is all about 'new is always better' (or in Doctor Who's case, change is always good). But because of that people are less loyal to various things now, so the lack of focus on retention is problematic in the long run.

For myself, depending on what age you call 'young' and if I were completely unaware of anything Doctor Who, I might be interested from the standpoint of the "fairy godmother granting all your wishes" ad and the glass ceiling ad for the special FX. I've always been attracted to special fx. And these ads would have been enough to attract me to WATCH, whether I would have continued or not, well, even as an adult who's watched Who since I was a tyke, that remains to be seen...


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6 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Mon Sep 10, 2018 10:20 pm

Well, speaking practically, if they could get touch 10 million viewers for Episode 1, it's rather worthless if they lose 60% of that henceforth.

As for the mechanism of marketing it would obviously depend on the particulars. In broadcasting, nobody is going to see such a sharp incline of viewing figures and interpret it as a good sign. You can't say you've gained viewers if your mean audience figures have dropped. Look at the Walking Dead for a good example of the failure of the pure publicity-orientated marketing psychology.

I really can't see many children being attracted by a glass shattering sequence. Special effects are ubiquitous in the modern visual culture, I'd expect fatigue for anything that isn't entirely alien - which isn't something we've seen thus far in the marketing. It seems that they're going for a more 'adult' historical-focused design.

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7 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Tue Sep 11, 2018 12:02 am

Well, I guess we'll see in hindsight. I mean, what would any of us thought in around 2000 or so if we were told that not only would Doctor Who be back in 2005, it'd still be running 13 years later?

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8 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Tue Sep 11, 2018 6:22 am

@TiberiusDidNothingWrong wrote:As for the mechanism of marketing it would obviously depend on the particulars. In broadcasting, nobody is going to see such a sharp incline of viewing figures and interpret it as a good sign. You can't say you've gained viewers if your mean audience figures have dropped. Look at the Walking Dead for a good example of the failure of the pure publicity-orientated marketing psychology.

I never got into the Walking Dead (I haven't had cable in nearly 20 years and haven't had tv in over 10 - I'm not the target for any TV marketing ploy). But it all depends on who the Beeb is considering their 'mean'. Obviously, it's not fans who've watched since Classic Who - even though we're the ones with kids who were brought up with NuWho, and we've supported Who throughout the run.

To me, it looks like they're after the 8-12 year old age group. It all has an "After School Special" feel to it. And if that's the age group and most people have more than one television in the household these days, it is entirely possible for the kiddies to go off and watch DW while the adults find something different to watch. So estimates are still estimates for viewership.

If they get a lot of new targeted viewers with this marketing, even if they lose us long-term fans in the process, the marketing will be considered a success, because their target audience was reached. That's how success in marketing is measured these days. (I'm not saying I agree with this measurement, just that's how it is measured.)


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9 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Tue Sep 11, 2018 6:38 am

@shan164 wrote:Well, I guess we'll see in hindsight. I mean, what would any of us thought in around 2000 or so if we were told that not only would Doctor Who be back in 2005, it'd still be running 13 years later?

Hindsight is 20/20, as they say. Though, I suspect in this case, success, will be more subjective than objective and I doubt even if there is a failure on their part, the Beeb will never admit it.


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10 Re: Marketing of Series 11 on Tue Sep 11, 2018 11:58 am

@tardis wrote:
For myself, depending on what age you call 'young' and if I were completely unaware of anything Doctor Who, I might be interested from the standpoint of the "fairy godmother granting all your wishes" ad and the glass ceiling ad for the special FX.  I've always been attracted to special fx.  And these ads would have been enough to attract me to WATCH, whether I would have continued or not, well, even as an adult who's watched Who since I was a tyke, that remains to be seen...

LOL LOL LOL

Thanks for the laugh. I needed that.

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