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Which Who Stories Have you seen lately?

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451Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Tue 24 Sep 2019, 1:09 pm

Ronnie

Ronnie
Nice review.
I haven't seen this in far too long. Really must dig it out sometime. I like this story for its surrealism.

452Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 25 Sep 2019, 6:31 am

Kaijuko

Kaijuko
The Web of Fear - probably the first Who tale I watched as a nipper.
I love Episode 1 (perhaps because, for many years, that was the only part of TWOF available to watch, but still, what a lovely opener). The early scenes in the museum look and sound like something from a 1930's Horror film and the whole London Underground/Army HQ set up is very convincing - quite atmospheric and creepy. Anne Travers is an interesting character and yes, I fancy her.  

However...

1) It's too long ( for instance, how many scenes do we have to endure with the 'blithering Welsh imbecile' Evans the Driver?) and they were certainly getting their money's worth from that (admittedly well made) Underground train tunnel set.

2) Victoria is exceptionally bad in TWOF. She whines, whimpers and wails her way through all six episodes. Jeez...

3) The Yeti themselves make for a bizarre, surreal-looking threat to the London Underground but I do wish they had chosen a more convincing, less cuddly, less cumbersome adversary to invade our capital and menace the soldiers defending it. Everything about this production screams 'Quatermass!' but then you've got a bunch of teddy bears with glowing eyes lumbering down the tracks.  The Yeti belong in Tibet, I think.

Still, I enjoyed it - Troughton is always magical.

453Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 25 Sep 2019, 4:26 pm

burrunjor

burrunjor
@Bernard Marx wrote:
@Pepsi Maxil wrote:
@Bernard Marx wrote:
Flipped, and got heads. Mind Robber it is.

Make sure you let us know what you think about Zoe's magnificent arse in that catsuit. Keep it dirty please.
I’d prefer to keep it implicit and just call it magnificent as you say. LOL

Anyway, I thoroughly enjoyed this. The ever-present surrealism of this tale is superbly realised by David Maloney’s direction as well as a highly sinister musical score (one track of which would be later re-used in Inferno). The minimalist nature of the first episode is quite mesmerising, and the rest of the story retains an immeasurable charm. This story has been criticised by some for being overly twee, which I can understand, but there’s an underlying sinister atmosphere behind almost every scene that makes the fantasy-esque narrative unnerving as opposed to patronising, which separates whatever tweeness this story has from the ever-twee nature of New Who. Jamie’s face changing due to Hines taking a week off as a result of Chicken Pox also allows for something of a semi-meta narrative to appear which makes the story all the more endearing and unique (speaking of a meta narrative, the Tardis monitor briefly reads in part 1 ‘Producer: Peter Bryant’, which whilst obviously a production error, can amusingly be interpreted as an allusion to the role of the Tardis crew within the land of fiction).

The story’s few shortcomings can mainly be attributed to a few plotting errors, though I may have misinterpreted these: It’s established that for the Doctor to kill Medusa via the sword would result in him becoming fiction due to the printout stating that this would be the outcome, so he resorts to using the mirror, although this outcome can be traced back to what Perseus had already done in the work of fiction the printout was derived and influenced by, so would the Doctor have surely become fiction anyway? The rest of the story is very air tight in terms of writing for a narrative this surreal, though this stuck out to me, though I could be wrong and talking complete bollocks. The ending is also considerably rushed. However, on the whole, the story encapsulates the hypnotic, endearing and melancholic quality I love so much about 60s Doctor Who as a whole, and is more intelligent and imaginative than all of New Who put together.

I agree this was a great story. I always wondered what the creature in the white void was. It wasn't linked to the land of fiction, as it existed outside of all of time and space, whilst the white robots that appeared in the land of fiction were simply memories culled from the Doctors mind.

Makes you wonder though what it was, and why did it want them to go outside.

454Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 25 Sep 2019, 4:39 pm

Bernard Marx


@burrunjor wrote:
@Bernard Marx wrote:
@Pepsi Maxil wrote:
@Bernard Marx wrote:
Flipped, and got heads. Mind Robber it is.

Make sure you let us know what you think about Zoe's magnificent arse in that catsuit. Keep it dirty please.
I’d prefer to keep it implicit and just call it magnificent as you say. LOL

Anyway, I thoroughly enjoyed this. The ever-present surrealism of this tale is superbly realised by David Maloney’s direction as well as a highly sinister musical score (one track of which would be later re-used in Inferno). The minimalist nature of the first episode is quite mesmerising, and the rest of the story retains an immeasurable charm. This story has been criticised by some for being overly twee, which I can understand, but there’s an underlying sinister atmosphere behind almost every scene that makes the fantasy-esque narrative unnerving as opposed to patronising, which separates whatever tweeness this story has from the ever-twee nature of New Who. Jamie’s face changing due to Hines taking a week off as a result of Chicken Pox also allows for something of a semi-meta narrative to appear which makes the story all the more endearing and unique (speaking of a meta narrative, the Tardis monitor briefly reads in part 1 ‘Producer: Peter Bryant’, which whilst obviously a production error, can amusingly be interpreted as an allusion to the role of the Tardis crew within the land of fiction).

The story’s few shortcomings can mainly be attributed to a few plotting errors, though I may have misinterpreted these: It’s established that for the Doctor to kill Medusa via the sword would result in him becoming fiction due to the printout stating that this would be the outcome, so he resorts to using the mirror, although this outcome can be traced back to what Perseus had already done in the work of fiction the printout was derived and influenced by, so would the Doctor have surely become fiction anyway? The rest of the story is very air tight in terms of writing for a narrative this surreal, though this stuck out to me, though I could be wrong and talking complete bollocks. The ending is also considerably rushed. However, on the whole, the story encapsulates the hypnotic, endearing and melancholic quality I love so much about 60s Doctor Who as a whole, and is more intelligent and imaginative than all of New Who put together.

I agree this was a great story. I always wondered what the creature in the white void was. It wasn't linked to the land of fiction, as it existed outside of all of time and space, whilst the white robots that appeared in the land of fiction were simply memories culled from the Doctors mind.

Makes you wonder though what it was, and why did it want them to go outside.
There is a chilling ambiguity to episode 1, yes. The sequence in the white void bridles with atmosphere and unease, and does so with the charm and panache commonly found during 60s Who. It’s one of my personal favourite Troughton stories.

I’ll probably watch The Daleks next, followed by The Silurians. Actually, given that both stories are the second of their respective seasons and decades, I might also watch Meglos after Silurians as to maintain the pattern. Smile

455Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 25 Sep 2019, 9:51 pm

iank

iank
Downtime. I like it. Oh it's flawed, mainly because of the uber-low budget (the Yeti look really crap) but it's a decent story and has a nice lead performance from Nicholas Courtney. It's nice to see Lis Sladen and Deborah Watling (God, all the classic leads in this are dead) and I still vastly, vastly prefer Beverly Cressman's Kate to the block of wood we got in New Who...

456Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 25 Sep 2019, 10:20 pm

Pepsi Maxil

Pepsi Maxil
Chief Caretaker
@iank wrote:Downtime. I like it. Oh it's flawed, mainly because of the uber-low budget (the Yeti look really crap) but it's a decent story and has a nice lead performance from Nicholas Courtney. It's nice to see Lis Sladen and Deborah Watling (God, all the classic leads in this are dead) and I still vastly, vastly prefer Beverly Cressman's Kate to the block of wood we got in New Who...

Cressman gives me a block of wood.

457Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 25 Sep 2019, 10:48 pm

iank

iank
LOL

458Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sat 28 Sep 2019, 6:21 pm

Indrid Mercury

Indrid Mercury
The Two Doctors (1985)

This story is perhaps one of the most criminally underrated of the original series and my favorite from Colin's era (although I think Revelation Of The Daleks is his best). Whilst its far from Holmes best script and has quite a few flaws such as Peter Moffat's direction, a few plot holes and the wasted potential of the Sontarans. This is still a fun, cracking black comedy and the regulars (and guest stars Jacqueline Pearce and John Stratton) are all on top form. 4/5

Also it has one of the best soundtracks of the original series.


459Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sat 28 Sep 2019, 6:22 pm

Indrid Mercury

Indrid Mercury
Revelation Of The Daleks (1985)

After the rather underwhelming Resurrection Of The Daleks. Revelation sees Saward write a script that doesn't feel like its trying to be Earthshock 2.0. With a wonderful dark script that feels very Holmes inspired, great direction from Graeme Harper, mostly great performances from the cast (with the exception of Jenny Tomasin) and Roger Limb's eerie score. Revelation Of The Daleks is a classic that has many dark disturbing moments that are Who at its most wonderfully grotesque. 4.5/5

Its just a shame that after this. the series was put on hiatus and we were given the underwhelming 'Trial'.



Last edited by Mercury on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 3:28 pm; edited 1 time in total

460Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sat 28 Sep 2019, 11:01 pm

iank

iank
I love moi season 22.

461Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sat 28 Sep 2019, 11:17 pm

Indrid Mercury

Indrid Mercury
Its definitely the most underrated season of the original series.

462Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 1:24 am

Ronnie

Ronnie
Time of the Angels/Flesh and Stone

When I saw this at the time of broadcast I thought it was one of the best NuWho's I'd seen. I think I even gave it a 8/10, which by NuWho standards makes it a masterpiece. LOL
And I still think it's one of the better NuWho's, but I found it more hard going second time round, probably because back on transmission I was still wanting to like it more, whereas now I feel like I'm seeing it for what it really is, and the stupid and/or corny bits really seem to stand out. I'd forgotten all about River Song and how off-putting the character was. The infantile scripts about the Tardis landing. The stupidity of the hand biting to save Amy's life, and her ott reaction to it. Instead of running for her very life to escape the Angels, we are forced to indulge in this silliness which totally detracts from any semblance of serious drama that the story is trying to achieve. The cornball cliffhanger where the Doctor gets to project his ego is all eye-rollingly tedious.
It's such a shame because Moffat does have the capacity to write SOME good stuff, and that is very evident from some of the scenes here which rack up the tension, and present a really credible threat in a dramatic way. But he will insist on peppering his scripts with a constant stream of inanities, and I for one find it really wearing....
Even so, it has to be acknowledged that Smith still manages to acquit himself far better than Tennant in general, but no actor can save the worst aspects of Moffat's writing.
I'll give it a generous 7/10.

463Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 8:08 am

Bernard Marx


I’ve recently re-watched the second story of each respective decade of Who, mainly for the sheer hell of it (and because the trend seemed fun to adhere to), though after browsing the old Hive, discovered Rob Filth’s ‘Doctor Who through the decades’ reviews where he does the same thing. I liked the look of it, and thought I’d try that format myself in order to add variety to my Who viewings, and to compare each decade’s overall style and quality for fun.

1960s ‘The Daleks’:
A thoroughly atmospheric tale that, in spite of being arguably an episode overlong, seems rather underrated in fandom and deserves more recognition that it gets. What instantly stands out is Tristram Cary’s electronic score, which is frankly superbly understated and often subtly spine-chilling (especially his ‘Dalek city’ tracks, which for some reason reminds me of the ‘Lux Aeterna’ tracks from 2001: A Space Odyssey), and the characterisation of the original Tardis crew is already starting to come into its own. The Daleks are brilliantly portrayed here too, never coming across as caricatured as with some later stories and maintaining their sinister and inhuman aura throughout the story. Although the story does lose some of its pace after episode 4, and episode 6 is essentially a mere filler which could have been cut down, there is no denying this story’s status as a classic, and one which quite rightly transformed the programme into a televisual phenomenon.

1970s ‘The Silurians’:
Instantly coming across as grittier than the stories of its prior decade (as with all season 7 stories), this seven parter is generally superb from start to finish. Malcolm Hulke’s often challenging and intelligent script provides a thought-provoking moral quandary concerning both the human and Silurian characters, and while the Silurians are ultimately presented as the central aggressors in the story, the Brigadier’s final action of destroying the final vestiges of the hibernating Silurians encapsulates Hulke’s notion that every character has some degree of questionable moral qualities. Something which New Who rarely endeavours to analyse. While the story certainly has setbacks, mainly that of Blyton’s music (which is occasionally better than his other efforts, though the Kazoo music is completely out of place) and the story perhaps being an episode too long, everything about the script works brilliantly, and the morals and philosophy of the story never descend into coziness as with some later Pertwees. Very good indeed.

1980s ‘Meglos’:
From a gritty and at times uncompromising story comes a very lightweight affair. This story does often feel like a Williams era effort inserted into season 18, which makes it something of a standout within the season, albeit an unpopular one. Although I admittedly rather enjoyed it to a degree- Tom seems fairly enthused here (likely due to his doppelganger role as Meglos, in spite of appearing relatively ill), which isn’t necessarily the case for the majority of season 18, and Peter Howell’s score isn’t too bad either, and the story itself is relatively breezy as to sustain the overall lightweight nature of it. The story just doesn’t have much to offer narratively, mind, and it is also clear that the story’s episodes are shorter than most due to this (there seems to be a vague attempt to cover it up via extended reprieves at the start of each episode). Enjoyable for what it is, and not as bad as many say, though nothing special.

2000s ‘The End Of The World’:
Oh, dear. I knew this wasn’t going to hold up on another viewing, but this really is fucking shite. Eccleston is at his gurning worst here, dancing to ‘Tainted Love’ in a decidedly cringeworthy fashion, and his dialogue ranges from “Is it a bit nippy” to “just chill” for most of the story. RTD’s obsession for popcultural referencing is also at its idiotic worst here, playing fucking Britney Spears during a scene where key characters are in danger (tonal inconsistency is something RTD specialises in), and Cassandra referring to ‘Tainted Love’ as a work from one of humanity’s “greatest composers’ is a testament to RTD’s plainly rubbish taste. The whole thing looks garish too due to the over-reliance on CGI- nothing about it feels or seems real due to the sheer artificiality of it all. It’s visually dated so badly- more so than any era of the original series bar perhaps season 23. Even Meglos, for its lightness, seemed to have more grit and impact to it than this did. Bloody awful.

2010s ‘The Beast Below’:
I know this story isn’t exactly popular, and I wasn’t a big fan initially either, but besides the overly mawkish and patronising final speech from Amy and the tawdry nature of the ending, this is fucking light years ahead of the Eccleston story. For a start, it actually dares to have atmosphere, with decent (and even somewhat surreal) lighting and direction, and Murray Gold is a little more restrained during the first 30 minutes too. The overall central concept is much more interesting too, and not laden with patronising glibness or awful popcultural references, and need I point out how much better Smith is in every way than Eccleston (and Gillan better than Piper)? At least his physical mannerisms are on point and more quintessentially alien, even if, as Ronnie points out, he may still be caricatured at heart due to the New Who approach. Though the story is laden with a handful of plotting errors and a generally crap ending (at least in terms of Murray Gold’s music and the overwrought nature of Amy’s dialogue by the end), I don’t see why Moffat’s children allegedly hate this one.

The best one was certainly a toss up between the 60s and 70s this time around- the 60s had the better atmosphere, whilst the 70s had the best overall script. I’d personally gravitate towards the 60s and pick ‘The Daleks’ due to its legendary contributions to the programme’s longevity, though this is no indictment of the fantastic ‘The Silurians’.

I’ll probably continue doing this if I ever get the time (I had yesterday all to myself to finish re-watching these)- it was fun writing this, and to alternate between decades is certainly preferable to re-watching it in the traditional order due to the variety.

464Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 9:28 am

iank

iank
Yeah, I've warmed to the Beast Below a lot too over the years (to no one's surprise Big Grin )

And yes, it's a fuckton better than The End of the Show. Razz

465Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 9:41 am

Pepsi Maxil

Pepsi Maxil
Chief Caretaker
Karen Gillan sparked my sexual awakening Big Grin Was completely obsessed with her when Series 5 aired.

466Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 10:07 am

Bernard Marx


@iank wrote:Yeah, I've warmed to the Beast Below a lot too over the years (to no one's surprise Big Grin )

And yes, it's a fuckton better than The End of the Show. Razz
Without a doubt. The End of the World came across as by far the most infantile and stupid of all the stories from each decade listed above. I don’t understand how particular subsections of fandom think that New Who somehow plummeted once RTD left, at least immediately.

Series 5 isn’t perfect, and has its fair share of bad archetypal New Who moments, but it shines above the previous New Who seasons in every conceivable way. At least they managed to get the lighting and the direction right, rather than camp everything up and date it beyond all recognition as with RTD’s era. The Beast Below’s last 5-10 minutes were admittedly very poor (mainly due to archetypal New Who mawkishness and a serious lack of narrative subtlety), but the overall story at least felt earnest to some extent and more in the spirit of TruWho. It’s not a patch on the 60s and 70s stories, mind.

467Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 10:53 am

Ronnie

Ronnie
The first half is pretty good, then it starts rapidly going downhill. I haven't really got a problem with Smith, it's just Moffat and co that fuck it up.
As for Karen Gillan, she's definitely way better than Piper, who was too strident for my liking. Karen is more believable. And yes she's very gorgeous too. Lol

468Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 11:56 am

Bernard Marx


@Ronnie wrote:The first half is pretty good, then it starts rapidly going downhill. I haven't really got a problem with Smith, it's just Moffat and co that fuck it up.
As for Karen Gillan, she's definitely way better than Piper, who was too strident for my liking. Karen is more believable. And yes she's very gorgeous too. Lol
Yeah- I’ll have a harder time with the 2010s stuff as my re-watches continue due to Moffat & co fucking it up. Still, I’ll try to not dwell on that aspect of it for now. My next Who story will be Ambassadors Of Death, so that’s at least worth looking forward to, though I’ve no clue when I’ll watch it as of yet.

To be fair, I wouldn’t even blame Eccleston, or Piper, or any of the actors involved in New Who. It’s mostly how they’re written that really grates, as you say- how else are you suppose to perform with such shite material and characterisation to work with?

469Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 12:11 pm

Ronnie

Ronnie
Well I'm just waiting for my Pertwee S10 blu ray before I crack on with the classic series. In the interim I'll carry where I left off with NuWho S5, where and when I get chance.
Mind you, it's Vampires in Venice next, which on transmission I thought was utter shite, so it's gonna be hard to get the enthusiasm up for that one. 😂

470Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 12:18 pm

Ronnie

Ronnie
In the meantime, I'll look forward to your thoughts on Ambassadors. You write much more in depth reviews than I can manage. Lol

471Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 1:18 pm

Ronnie

Ronnie
@Pepsi Maxil wrote:Karen Gillan sparked my sexual awakening Big Grin  Was completely obsessed with her when Series 5 aired.

Are you tempted?

Wink

472Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 1:29 pm

Pepsi Maxil

Pepsi Maxil
Chief Caretaker
@Ronnie wrote:
@Pepsi Maxil wrote:Karen Gillan sparked my sexual awakening Big Grin  Was completely obsessed with her when Series 5 aired.

Are you tempted?

Wink

Very nice Big Grin  

I'd like to buy this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Karen-Gillan-Lipstick-Celebrity-Mask-Card-Face/163805358733?hash=item26238f6a8d:g:e2oAAOSwTSldSDQ-

Cut out the mouth and I'm good to go LOL





























473Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Sun 29 Sep 2019, 9:43 pm

iank

iank
LOL

474Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 02 Oct 2019, 9:07 pm

Bernard Marx


OK- here are my next set of reviews (done in Rob Filth’s original style) of the next set of stories I’ve watched. I’ll try to make them comprehensive, yet concise:

1960s ‘The Edge Of Destruction’:
A bizarre character piece which opens with a considerable amount of unease and atmosphere, as the Tardis is allegedly infested with some sort of external force which seems to considerably affect the psyche of each of the main characters. Hartnell’s Doctor is something of a bastard in this one for the most part- an aspect to his character I admittedly thoroughly enjoy- though his final character moment with Barbara is a touching and pertinent one which already sees considerable character growth for the Doctor without ever veering towards the over-sentimental. Where the story fails is in its narrative resolution: The notion that a broken switch caused the Tardis to fuck itself up isn’t an illogical one in itself (and this also marks the first venturing of Who into the event of the Big Bang- something which would manifest again in TruWho and NuWho), though is certainly anti-climatic and frankly rather lazy from a dramatic perspective. This narrative decision isn’t fundamentally damaging due to not breaking the logic of the story (as with so many of NuWho’s deux-ex-machinas), but it does grate a little. Pretty good, and a rather bold low budget experiment, though certainly a very flawed one.

1970s ‘The Ambassadors Of Death’:
Surprisingly, I found myself enjoying this more than The Silurians on a recent viewing, which wasn’t the case before, but this story is criminally underrated in almost every way. The direction is appropriately gritty and even at times noticeably dynamic during many of the action scenes, making for very involving viewing, and the manner within which the story subverts traditional alien invasion sub-genre conventions by the final few episodes is highly intelligent indeed, and shows a breadth of narrative maturity akin to that present in The Silurians before it. Dudley Simpson’s score is noticeably good too (not something I can say about all of his output, quite honestly), and certainly an improvement on Blyton’s score for The Silurians. The story’s only flaws are that of a few plotting errors (how is anyone capable of sneaking two bombs into UNIT HQ without ever being checked or searched either time, and what does the Doctor actually do with the tape at the start of episode 2?), though it doesn’t distract too avidly from where the story success. And contrary to what many say, this story rarely dragged on this latest viewing at all. Very good indeed.

1980s ‘Full Circle’:
I know this story is a little divisive here, but bar some occasional shite acting from Waterhouse and the other child actors, I thought this was great. An intelligent narrative which comments on the flaws of passivity in scientific progression- what I found especially interesting was how such a motif ironically resolves itself by the end of the E-Space trilogy, where the more beneficial elements of passivity (largely in relation to Entropy) are explored. It’s cleverly interwoven without being shoved down the audience’s throat (which admittedly starts to happen by season 18’s final two stories). And although some here assert that Tom looks bored, and indeed he is quite reserved for much of the story, there are particular scenes (mainly his confrontation with the deciders after their callous attempts at dissecting and resulting in the death of a marshman) where he performs brilliantly. It’s also generally very well produced and scored, and the story at least never patronises its audience unlike most NuWho efforts. Very underrated.

2000s ‘The Unquiet Dead’:
Hmm. An interesting one. This isn’t laden with anywhere near as many moronic RTD trademarks as the previous 2000s story due to being helmed by a different writer, and the overall premise is great- it’s rare to see a NuWho story of the era actually pace itself and allow atmosphere to slowly build. Although something about this story annoyed me on my latest viewing. I’m not sure if it was due to Eccleston’s grating characterisation (from gurning over Charles Dickens in a manner the previous Doctors wouldn’t, to once again being completely useless and ineffective at resolving a single situation even indirectly), or the occasional RTD jab within the script (“nice bum” etc), but this came across as a little staid this time around. Still, this story has its good qualities, and if finetuned a little more, could have been genuinely really rather good. It’s certainly an improvement on the previous shitefest, though I know that such a relief will be short-lived.

2010s ‘Victory Of The Daleks’:
Well, that was piss-poor. The first 10 minutes or so of this aren’t too bad, though it very quickly deteriorates into a truly idiotic runaround where some crap new Daleks are introduced for cynical commercialism, and where the Doctor once again gets next to fuck all to do beyond stand around and shout. The Doctor’s dialogue in this is appalling, and were likely written for Tennant (“How about that cuppa now, eh?”)- as much as I like Smith, he’s incapable of coming across as genuinely Doctorish here due to this shite characterisation. The Daleks are wasted here too, with a staggeringly shit conclusion where the power of love saves the day again. Jesus Christ. The ironic thing about this is that although NuWho often tries so hard to tug at one’s heartstrings, it lacks any bite or grit to truly provide any sort of gut-punch. It’s as if NuWho tries so hard to aim for an Aristotelian Catharsis every time, but without allowing any Pity or Fear into the scripts at all as to allow for any sense of dread beforehand (we never see the Daleks commit anything truly sadistic or nasty as to make such an ending hit hard, and this isn’t even considering how dumb the ending fundamentally is in the first place), hence why it comes across as so patronising and never provides an open-minded viewer with any genuine emotional satisfaction. I apologise to any series 5 fans on here (I’m essentially one of them, I guess), but this was as genuinely shite as the most piss poor RTD efforts. Fucking appalling.

So, which story was the best here? After weighing up all the factors, I’d have to go for the 70s and select Ambassadors. The overall gritty direction and script coupled with a narrative that held my attention for nearly three hours ensured that it ascended above the other stories. The 60s were good but very narratively flawed, the 80s suffered somewhat due to some shite child acting, the 2000s seemed to adhere to RTD’s worst characteristics as soon as the narrative became genuinely interesting and involving, and the 2010s were downright awful this time around.

475Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? - Page 19 Empty Re: Which Who Stories Have you seen lately? on Wed 02 Oct 2019, 9:53 pm

iank

iank
Victory is dire, easily the worst of 5.
I prefer Ambassadors to Silurians too. It's the closest of my "season 7 is Who as Callan" analogy too. Wink

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